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NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT IN THE WEST

A Tale of Two Migrations

A Tale of Two Migrations

The splash of one fish ripples through an ecosystem

In 2007, biologist Arthur Middleton was studying the Clark’s Fork elk herd

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The Trout Effect

The Trout Effect

Aug 3, 2015

Cutthroat trout once linked aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in Yellowstone National Park. As their numbers decline, the link is weakening.

Grizzlies and Whitebarks

Grizzlies and Whitebarks

Aug 3, 2015

Where do bears turn when an important food source starts to vanish?

Golden and red-hued leaves and crisp evenings mark the coming of fall in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Nomad, Weaver, Storyteller

Nomad, Weaver, Storyteller

Aug 3, 2015

Fiber artist Doris Florig weaves natural history in her tapestries

“While experimenting with natural dye materials for the pronghorn coat

Essay: Wyoming Wins with Wildlife

Essay: Wyoming Wins with Wildlife

Aug 3, 2015

The cow and yearling moose that inhabited my densely populated west Jackson neighborhood all winter finally

The West’s Water

The West’s Water

Dec 23, 2014

Photo Essay

Water, or perhaps the absence of water, defines the Wyoming landscape and shapes the species that live on it. Big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata) is one species particularly well adapted to Wyoming’s arid climate.

Measuring Return Flows

Measuring Return Flows

Dec 23, 2014

This story is a sidebar to One Irrigator’s Waste is Another’s Supply: Upstream Efficiencies Mean Less Water for Downstream Users in Nebraska’s Panhandle.

As a child in northeastern Wyoming, I remember my summers as irrigation season.

Dust on Snow

Dust on Snow

Dec 23, 2014

A Dirty Mountain Snow Pack Affects Communities Downstream

This story is a sidebar to Supercomputer-Powered Model Improves Water Planning: A Hi-Resolution Hydrologic Model Peers into the Future of Western Water.

The Great Water Transfer

The Great Water Transfer

Dec 23, 2014

Diverting Water from Basin to Basin

In the summer of 1860, farmers in central Colorado found Left Hand Creek dry.[1] They started looking for replacement water.

No-Name

No-Name

Dec 23, 2014

Asking Big Questions About Hydrology in One Little Watershed

Square solar panels congregate on weathered tree stumps in a small open area in the Medicine Bow National Forest.

Finding Teton Glacier

Finding Teton Glacier

Dec 23, 2014

My partner Matt and I left the Lupine Meadows parking lot in Grand Teton National Park at sunrise, his long stride covering miles quickly, my short stride moving fast to keep up.